About the Journal

Ekistics and the New Habitat is an international, peer-reviewed, online journal whose mission is to improve the quality of human settlements. It does so by disseminating research and innovation related to all types and bounded frames of human settlement across all scales and developmental contexts. The journal publishes three issues annually and engages with pressing issues in architecture, urban design, planning and sustainable development.

Pioneered by C.A. Doxiadis, ekistics is understood and practiced as the science of human settlements. Being both systematic and holistic in its approach, ekistics has always attracted exceptional individuals who routinely extend their respective fields. While Ekistics and the New Habitat has its roots in the renowned journal of Ekistics (1957-2007) and its associated World Society, the journal has evolved into an online critical space for transdisciplinary dialogue and exchange.

Our journal connects researchers and practitioners who enjoy innovating in a range of fields. We welcome scholarly contributions and book reviews that have the potential to deepen our understanding of historic human settlements, to make progress dealing with contemporary issues, and to develop future-oriented solutions to virtual and material problems. Contributions to regular, themed, and special issues can be made at any time and will be subject to double-blind peer review.  

Indexing

Ekistics and the New Habitat is indexed in CrossRef. Our journal and its articles are also automatically archived to LOCKSS at Stanford University USA, and CLOCKSS via our PKP-OJS hosted platform as linked in our Crossref membership for our DOI and article indexing services, as well as being manually archived at a normal “moving window” to JSTOR.

LOCKSS: “Lots of copies keeps stuff safe”

CLOCKSS: “Controlled LOCKSS”. CLOCKSS is an auto archive system of our articles via PKP OJS hosting that is built on top pf LOCKSS system.

The CrossRef system is used for linking citations across publishers. To ensure direct linking to and from its contents, Ekistics and the New Habitat is linked to CrossRef. Online archives have also been indexed.

Every Article is provided with DOI and will remain the permanent link of that article.

Editor-in-Chief

Derya Oktay, PhD, Pg Dip.UD, MArch, BArch
Professor, Maltepe University, Turkey
email: editor@ekisticsjournal.org

Deputy Editor/Journal Manager

Ian Fookes, PhD, CELTA
Lecturer, University of Auckland, New Zealand
email: deputyeditor@ekisticsjournal.org

Honorary Editor

Kurt Seemann, PhD
Professor (adj) / Associate Professor, Federation University, Australia

Editorial Board 

Ioannis Aris Alexiou
Associate Professor, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Colombia

Christopher Benninger
Distinguished Professor / Management of CEPT University, Ahmedabad; President of the Centre for Development Studies, Pune, India

Ray Bromley
Professor Emeritus, State University of New York (Albany), USA

Myrto Exacoustou
MSc, Independent Researcher, Ministry of Culture, Greece   

George A. Giannopoulos
Professor Emeritus, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Corresponding Member of the Academy of Athens

Manuel Correia Guedes
Professor, Instituto Técnico Lisboa, Portugal

Çağatay Keskinok
Professor, Middle East Technical University, Turkey

Robert W. Marans
Professor Emeritus, Survey Research Center & Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, USA

Catharine Nagashima
Visiting Lecturer, Yokohama City University, Japan

Yenny Rahmayati
Assistant Professor, Prince Sultan University, Saudi Arabia

Koon Wee
Assistant Professor, University of Hong Kong, China

Assistant Editors

Harrison Blackman
Fulbright Fellow, MFA, University of Nevada, USA

Ioanna Theocharopoulou
Visiting Lecturer, Cornell University, USA

Lefteris Theodosis
Consultant, Gerber Architekten International, Berlin, Germany


Call for papers to Ekistics and the New Habitat

The revised online double-blind, peer-reviewed international journal of Ekistics and the New Habitat, publishes scholarly insights and reflective practice of studies and critical writing concerning the problems and science of human settlements.  The field of study is mapped against a classification of settlement scale, from the remote village to the rural township, to dense smart cities, and increasingly the challenges of on-and-off world sustainable habitats.  In broad terms, papers in Ekistics and the New Habitat seek to grow scholarly insights and application knowledge of the relationship between people, our human settlement designs and systems, and our natural biosphere.  

There are few scholarly journals whose papers archive the history of development and thought evolution tracing back to 1957 - excepting Ekistics.  This background makes for an extraordinary historical collection for research and practices documenting how humans have colonised the planet and transformed our built habitats.  The journal welcomes papers from students, post-graduate candidates, academics and practitioners. We invite papers, typically but not exclusively, of a cross-disciplinary nature, that:

Targets any aspect of the United Nations New Urban Agenda, in Habitat III,  including reference to the Sustainable Development Goals.
Critiques local, regional and global policy of human settlement development, design and planning, and urban transformation
offers a critical description of core elements that define the liveability of human settlements such as:


NATURE: Habitat foundations. How settlements rely upon, interact with, alter, or produce living ecologies, biodiversity, and climate.
PEOPLE: Physiological/biological and social-psychological needs and constraints. How settlements rely upon, interact with, or affect people's livelihood, safety, knowledge/education, security and well-being – whether they are transiting visitors, settlers (citizens), or neighbours of settlements.
SOCIETY: Social, economic, and political organisation.  How settlements rely upon, interact with, or are affected by governance, the education of citizens over their lifespan, vicarious or present communities, groups, markets, and economics. 
SHELLS: The envelopes that contain settlement functions. How the design, technologies and spaces created or removed in settlements affect the functions and amenity of the settlement from the scale of personal shelter, to the home, and to urban business districts and precincts.
NETWORKS: Node-to-node systems and flows of resources, waste, data, people and information. How the design, technologies and flow of goods, waste, resources, data, people and information affect a settlement's functionality and amenity.
SYNTHESIS:  Combined, coherent design and knowledge.  Physical design and planning; Ekistic theory expressed through evolving models and principles. How systems of systems may differ from small and remote, to large and urban-dense settlements.

The journal invites and accepts three types of submissions, all peer-reviewed for their type:

Scholarly articles/reviews (full papers, double-blind review): typically, with title, authors, institutional affiliations, abstract, keywords, body text (5000-7000 words), and APA 7th References at the end of the article. Body text typically includes:
an introduction to a problem or topic outlining the need for the research,
the key prior papers in Ekistics and other sources that relate to the topic,
the methodological or conceptual framework and methods used,
the summary of key results or findings, 
a critical concluding discussion.
The Editor assigns the paper to its appropriate location in the Ekistics grid index for classification continuity with past papers. 

Scholarly essays/extended abstracts (double-blind review):  typically, with title, authors, institutional affiliations, keywords, body text (1000-1500 words), and APA 7th References at the end of the article. These shorter submissions are well placed for academics and practitioners seeking to share a critical reflection of an issue, or for first-time students seeking to publish an academic submission (with often a mentor as co-author). They may focus on a think piece critique, or a project, or a state of play of a regional and geo-locational issue.
Practioner, industry or citizen think-piece (short article only, peer review): typically, with title, authors, regional/organisational affiliations, keywords, body text (500-1000 words). Where appropriate, APA 7th References at the end of the article may be included. These shorter submissions are well placed for practitioners, industry or citizen to raise issues to which we invite the research community to respond. 

In addition, we welcome book reviews. Book review submissions are copy-edited, normally 300-500 words, designed to share with the readership community interesting or provocative volumes, monographs, or edited books that may be of interest to scholars, practitioners and students of human settlements, the New Urban Agenda, and the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations.

 

Current Issue

Vol. 81 No. 3 (2021): The Global Pacific: Coastal and Human Habitats
					View Vol. 81 No. 3 (2021): The Global Pacific: Coastal and Human Habitats

Inspired by Epeli Hau’ofa’s revolutionary description of the Pacific as a ‘Sea of Islands’, the contributors to the special issue, ‘The Global Pacific: Coastal and Human Habitats’, demonstrate that the Pacific can be understood in new and innovative ways. Contributions include architectural imaginings, literary and aesthetic analyses, poetry, political analysis, and studies whose methodologies are based on Pacific ways of knowing. The juxtaposition of disciplinary, and interdisciplinary studies enables a transdisciplinary dialogue within the issue that reflects a ‘global perspective’. 

Published: 2022-09-29

Editor's Desk

Table of Contents

Guest Editor: Special Issue

Scholarly Articles and Reviews

General

Ekistic Grid Index

Back Matter

View All Issues

The online double-blind, peer-reviewed international journal of  Ekistics and the New Habitat, publishes scholarly insights and reflective practice of studies and critical writing concerning the problems and science of human settlements.  The field of study is mapped against a classification of settlement scale, from the remote village to the rural township, to dense smart cities, and increasingly the challenges of on-and-off world sustainable habitats.  In broad terms, papers in Ekistics and the New Habitat  seek to grow scholarly insights and application knowledge of the relationship between people, our human settlement designs and systems, and our natural biosphere.  

Call for papers to Ekistics and the New Habitat

NOTE: You must first create or have a Login User Account (Free) to access some of the links below.

DOWNLOAD AUTHOR TEMPLATE AND GUIDE HERE

There are few scholarly journals whose papers archive a history of development and thought evolution tracing back to 1957 - excepting Ekistics.  This makes for an extraordinary historical collection of research and practice documenting how humans have colonised the planet and transformed our built habitats.  The journal seeks papers from students, post-graduate candidates, academics and practitioners. We seek papers, typically of a cross-disciplinary nature, that:

  • targets any aspect of the United Nations New Urban Agenda, in Habitat III,  including reference to the Sustainable Development Goals.
  • critiques local, regional and global policy of human settlement development, design and planning, and urban transformation
  • offers a critical description of core elements that define the liveability of human settlements such as:

    • NATURE: Habitat foundations. How settlements rely upon, interact with, alter, or produce living ecologies, biodiversity, and climate.
    • PEOPLE: Physiological/biological and social-psychological needs and constraints. How settlements rely upon, interact with, or affect people's livelihood, safety, knowledge, security and well-being – whether they are transiting visitors, settlers (citizens), or neighbours of settlements.
    • SOCIETY: Social, economic, and political organisation.  How settlements rely upon, interact with, or are affected by governance, the education of citizens over their lifespan, vicarious or present communities, groups, markets, and economics. 
    • SHELLS: The envelopes that contain settlement functions. How the design, technologies and spaces created or removed in settlements affect the functions and amenity of the settlement from the scale of personal shelter, to the home, and to urban business districts and precincts.
    • NETWORKS: Node-to-node systems and flows of resources, waste, data, people and information. How the design, technologies and flow of goods, waste, resources, data, people and information affect a settlement's functionality and amenity.
    • SYNTHESIS:  Combined, coherent design and knowledge.  Physical design and planning; Ekistic theory expressed through evolving models and principles. How systems of systems may differ from small and remote to large and urban-dense settlements.

 

The journal invites and accepts three types of submissions, all peer-reviewed for their type:

  1. Scholarly articles/topic reviews (full papers, double-blind review): typically, with title, authors, institutional affiliations, abstract, keywords, body text (5000-7000 words), and APA 7th References at the end of the article. Body text typically includes:
    • an introduction to a problem or topic outlining the need for the research,
    • the key prior papers in Ekistics and other sources that relate to the topic,
    • the methodological or conceptual framework and methods used,
    • the summary of key results or findings, 
    • a critical concluding discussion.
    • The Editor assigns the paper to its appropriate location in the Ekistics grid index for classification continuity with past papers. 

  2. Scholarly abstracts only (extended abstracts, double-blind review):  typically, with title, authors, institutional affiliations, keywords, body text (1000-1500 words), and APA 7th References at the end of the article. These shorter submissions are well placed for academics and practitioners seeking to share a critical reflection of an issue, or for first-time students seeking to publish an academic submission (with often a mentor as co-author). They may focus on a think piece critique, or a project, or a state of play of a regional and geo-locational issue.

  3. Practitioner, industry or citizen think-piece (short article only, peer review): typically, with title, authors, regional/organisational affiliations, keywords, body text (500-1000 words). Where appropriate, APA 7th References at the end of the article may be included. These shorter submissions are well placed for practitioners, industry or citizen to raise issues to which we invite the research community to respond. 

In addition, we welcome book reviews. Book review submissions are copy-edited, normally 300-500 words, designed to share with the readership community interesting or provocative volumes, monographs, or edited books that may be of interest to scholars, practitioners and students of human settlements, the New Urban Agenda, and the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations.