About the Journal

The International Journal of Ekistics and the New Habitat is an online double-blind, internationally peer reviewed research journal. The journal publishes scholarly insights and reflective practice of studies and critical writing concerning the problems and science of human settlements. The field of Ekistics is mapped against a classification of settlement scale, from the remote village and rural township to global systems of dense smart cities, and increasingly the challenges of on-and-off world
sustainable habitats.

In broad terms, papers in Ekistics and the New Habitat contribute to the scholarly discourse about the systemic nature of how humans design, build, link-up and transform their world. Articles examine empirical and non-empirical research and ideas that critique the necessary relationship between people, our human settlement designs and technological systems, and our natural and designed habitat. Models, case studies, rigorous conceptual work, design interpretation, smart-citizen education for smart cities, resource flows, network behaviour, and reflective practice are published in order to continually improve and advance the application of integrated knowledge that defines the epistemic telos of Ekistics.

In reference to the history of the journal, the International Journal of Ekistics and the New Habitat: The Problems and Science of Human Settlements is rooted in the renowned Ekistics journal (1957-2006), which has evolved into a new online journal in 2019.

The sequential numbering of the volumes has been maintained in honour of the legacy of the preceding journal. Back issues of the previous journal are lodged with our archive partners at JSTOR in addition to the issues of Ekistics and the New Habitat.

Indexing

Ekistics and the New Habitat is indexed in CrossRef and included in the 2003+ list of the Australian Research Council's (ARC) approved scholarly journals for Australian Academics.

Our journal and its articles are also automatically archived to LOCKSS at Stanford University USA, and CLOCKSS via our PKP-OJS hosted platform as linked in our Crossref membership for our DOI and article indexing services, as well as being manually archived at a normal “moving window” to JSTOR.

LOCKSS: “Lots of copies keeps stuff safe”

CLOCKSS: “Controlled LOCKSS”. CLOCKSS is an auto archive system of our articles via PKP OJS hosting that is built on top pf LOCKSS system.

The CrossRef system is used for linking citations across publishers. To ensure direct linking to and from its contents, Ekistics and the New Habitat is linked to CrossRef. Online archives have also been indexed.

Every Article is provided with DOI and will remain the permanent link of that article.

 

EDITORIAL TEAM

Executive Board of Editors

Editor-in-Chief and Chair

Derya OKTAY, PhD, Pg DipUD, MArch, BArch
Professor of Architecture and Urban Design, Maltepe University, Turkey                                                            
Deputy Editor

Ian FOOKES, PhD, MA, BA (Hons) BA, CELTA.
Asst. Professor, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Honorary Editor

Kurt SEEMANN, PhD BSc, Dip.Ed (Hons)
Professor, Swinburn University, Australia

Associate Editors

Christopher BENNINGER, MArch, MCP
Distinguished Professor, Board of Management, CEPT University
President of the Centre for Development Studies - Pune, India

Manuel Correia GUEDES, PhD, MPhil, BArch
Professor, Instituto Técnico Lisboa, Portugal   

Celen PASALAR, PhD, MSc, BArch 
Associate Professor, North Carolina State University, USA

H. Koon WEE, FRSA, Ir., Ar., MArch, BArch, BA (AS)
Visiting Associate Professor, National University of Singapore, Singapore

 

Editorial Advisory Board

Mohsen ABOULNAGA
Professor, Cairo University, Egypt

Yenal AKGÜN
Professor, Dokuz Eylül University, Turkey

Chaham Rajab ALALOUCH 
Associate Professor, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman 
Editor-in-Chief, Open House International

Ioannis Aris ALEXIOU
Associate Professor, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Colombia

Ricardo ARRIBAS
Visiting Professor, University of Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico

Husam ALWAEER
Reader in Sustainable Urban Design, University of Dundee, UK
Editor-in-Chief, ICE Urban Design and Planning

Ray BROMLEY
Professor Emeritus, State University of New York - Albany, USA

Maristella CASCIATO
Professor, Senior Curator and Head of Architecture Special Collections
Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, USA

Elias CONSTANTOPOULOS
Professor, University of Patras, and President, Hellenic Institute of Architecture, Athens, Greece

Galen CRANZ
Emeritus Professor, University of California - Berkeley, USA

Neslihan DOSTOĞLU
Professor, Istanbul Kültür University, Turkey

Myrto EXACOUSTOU
MSc, Independent Researcher, Ministry of Culture, Greece

Kenneth B. FRAMPTON
Ware Professor, Columbia University, USA

Brian GOODEY
Emeritus Professor, Oxford Brookes University, UK

Ruşen KELEŞ
Emeritus Professor, University of Ankara, Turkey

Çağatay KESKINOK
Professor, Middle East Technical University, Turkey

Alexandros-Andreas KYRTSIS
Professor, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece

Jon LANG
Emeritus Professor, University of New South Wales, Australia

Roderick J. LAWRENCE
Honorary Professor, University of Geneva, Switzerland

Ali MADANIPOUR
Professor, Newcastle University, UK

Robert W. MARANS
Professor Emeritus, Survey Research Center & Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, USA

Ricardo Garcia MIRA
Professor, University of A Coruna, Spain
European Editor, Journal of Architectural and Planning Research

Prof. Dr. Jeong Min MOON
Professor, Chosun University, South Korea

Luca MUSCARÀ
Professor, Università degli Studi del Molise, Italy

Catharine NAGASHIMA
Visiting Lecturer, Yokohama City University, Japan

Gordana NESIC-SIMIC
MUD, Grad Dip UD, BA Urb Reg Planning, Urban Design Team Lead, GHD, Australia

Dimitris PHILIPPIDES 
Emeritus Professor, National Technical University of Athens, Greece

Attilio PETRUCCIOLI
Professor, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy

Panayiota PYLA
Professor, University of Cyprus, Republic of Cyprus

Ashraf SALAMA
Professor, Northumbria University, UK
Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Architectural Research

Henry SANOFF
Distinguished Professor, North Carolina State University, USA

Antonella TROMBADORE
Associate Professor, University of Florence, Italy

Handan TURKOGLU
Professor, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey

Zuhal ULUSOY
Professor, Bilgi University, Turkey

Georgia Butina WATSON
Professor, Oxford Brookes University, UK

 

Assistant Editors 

Harrison BLACKMAN
Fulbright Fellow, MFA, University of Nevada, USA

Ioanna THEOCHAROPOULOU
Visiting Lecturer, Cornell University, USA

 

Editorial Assistant

Tugce Ucar MAURER  MSc, BCP (USA)
PhD Candidate, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey, Urban and Regional Planner, Jefferson County, USA

 

Standard Call for Papers

The journal seeks papers from students, post-graduate candidates, academics and practitioners. We seek papers, typically of a cross-disciplinary nature that:
• Target any aspect of the United Nations New Urban Agenda, in Habitat III, including reference to the Sustainable Development Goals .
• Critiques local, regional and global policy of human settlement development, design and planning, and urban transformation
• Offers a critical description of the core elements that define the liveability of human settlements such as:
NATURE: Habitat foundations. How settlements rely upon, interact with, alter, or produce living ecologies, biodiversity, and climate.
PEOPLE: Physiological/biological and social-psychological needs and constraints. How settlements rely upon, interact with, or affect people's livelihood, safety, embodied and shared knowledge and skills, security and well-being – whether they are transiting visitors, settlers (citizens), or neighbours of settlements.
SOCIETY: Social, economic, educational systems, fiscal and political organisation. How settlements rely upon, interact with, or are affected by governance and leadership, vicarious or present communities, groups, markets, cultures, beliefs and values.
SHELLS: The envelopes that contain settlement functions. How the design, technologies and places created, altered or removed in settlements affect the functions and amenity of the settlement from the scale of personal shelter to the home, to urban business districts and precincts, to towns, cities or regions.
NETWORKS: Node-to-node systems and flows of resources, waste, data, people and information and communication systems. How the design, technologies and transport of goods, waste, energy, resources, water, food, people and information affect a settlement's functionality, amenity and viability.
SYNTHESIS: Combined, coherent design and knowledge. Physical design and planning; Ekistics theory expressed through evolving models and principles of habitat. How systems of systems may differ from small and remote, to large and urban- dense settlements and linked-up settlements in regions.

This journal invites and accepts four types of submissions, all double-blind and internationally peer-reviewed for their type:

1. Scholarly articles/reviews (full papers, double-blind review): typically, with title, authors, institutional affiliations, abstract, keywords, body text (4500-7000 words), and APA 7th References at the end of the article. Body text typically includes:

• an introduction to a problem or topic outlining the need for or goals of the research,
• the key prior papers in Ekistics archives and other sources that best relate to the topic,
• the methodological or conceptual framework and methods used,
• a summary of key results or findings,
• a critical concluding discussion

The Editor assigns papers to their best-fit classifications in the Ekistics grid index.

2. Viewpoint articles: typically proposed by an academic or professional with considerable experience, with title, author, institutional affiliation, body text (1500-3000 words), and APA 7th References at the end of the article. They may focus on a timely issue that aligns with the journal's areas of interest.

3. Scholarly essays/extended abstracts (double-blind review): typically, with title, authors, institutional affiliations, keywords, body text (1000-2500 words), and APA 7th References at the end of the article. These shorter submissions are well placed for academics and practitioners seeking to share a critical reflection of an issue, or for first- time students seeking to publish an academic submission (often co-authored with a mentor/supervisor). They may focus on a think piece style of critique, or a project in process, or a topic of interest for a geo-location or generic issue. Short Essays/Extended-Abstracts may be tested in Ekistics before a full paper version is submitted elsewhere.

4. Practitioner, industry or citizen think-piece (short article only, peer review): typically, with title, authors, regional/organisational affiliations, keywords, body text (500- 1000 words). A Citizen Think-piece may be up to 3000 words. Where appropriate, APA 7th References at the end of the article may be included. These shorter submissions are well placed for practitioners, industry or citizens to raise provocative ideas to which we invite the research community to respond in subsequent issues.

We welcome book reviews. Submissions are copy-edited, normally 1200-1500 words, designed to share with the readership community interesting or provocative volumes, monographs, or edited books that may be of interest to scholars, practitioners and students of human settlements, Habitat III New Urban Agenda, and the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations.

Current Issue

Vol. 84 No. 1 (2024): Regular Issue: Ekistics and the New Habitat
Title banner with arial view of settlements jet engine visible right

The International Journal of Ekistics and the New Habitat, since its evolution from the renowned Ekistics journal in 2019, has proven itself as an active global platform for systematic, international, and comprehensive publication. Undergoing a restructuring in the new leadership during the first half of 2023, the journal now operates on a two-pillar management system, consisting of a core executive board of editors and a substantial editorial advisory board, both characterized by diversity and distinction, including prominent scholars and experts spanning various continents and disciplines. Ekistics and the New Habitat journal presently prioritizes expanding its global academic community and enhancing visibility, through raising its standards to attain higher rankings in recognition of its commitment to excellence.

 

Inspired by Constantinos A. Doxiadis (1913-1975) whose international outlook and a mission to enhance the quality of human settlements founded Ekistics, this general issue presents a new perspective for Ekistics and the New Habitat journal by focusing on a variety of crucial subjects associated with human settlements, spanning both theoretical considerations and diverse developmental contexts in regular and themed issues. It features four scholarly articles authored by renowned academics, encouraging further reflection on different facets of cities and urban environments. Additionally, another esteemed scholar presents his viewpoint in an article of that nature - a recently introduced submission format for the journal.

Published: 2024-01-02
View All Issues

The online double-blind, peer-reviewed international journal of  Ekistics and the New Habitat, publishes scholarly insights and reflective practice of studies and critical writing concerning the problems and science of human settlements.  The field of study is mapped against a classification of settlement scale, from the remote village to the rural township, to dense smart cities, and increasingly the challenges of on-and-off world sustainable habitats.  In broad terms, papers in Ekistics and the New Habitat  seek to grow scholarly insights and application knowledge of the relationship between people, our human settlement designs and systems, and our natural biosphere.  

Call for papers to Ekistics and the New Habitat

NOTE: You must first create or have a Login User Account (Free) to access some of the links below.

There are few scholarly journals whose papers archive a history of development and thought evolution tracing back to 1957 - excepting Ekistics.  This makes for an extraordinary historical collection of research and practice documenting how humans have colonised the planet and transformed our built habitats.  The journal seeks papers from students, post-graduate candidates, academics and practitioners. We seek papers, typically of a cross-disciplinary nature, that:

  • targets any aspect of the United Nations New Urban Agenda, in Habitat III,  including reference to the Sustainable Development Goals.
  • critiques local, regional and global policy of human settlement development, design and planning, and urban transformation
  • offers a critical description of core elements that define the liveability of human settlements such as:

    • NATURE: Habitat foundations. How settlements rely upon, interact with, alter, or produce living ecologies, biodiversity, and climate.
    • PEOPLE: Physiological/biological and social-psychological needs and constraints. How settlements rely upon, interact with, or affect people's livelihood, safety, knowledge, security and well-being – whether they are transiting visitors, settlers (citizens), or neighbours of settlements.
    • SOCIETY: Social, economic, and political organisation.  How settlements rely upon, interact with, or are affected by governance, the education of citizens over their lifespan, vicarious or present communities, groups, markets, and economics. 
    • SHELLS: The envelopes that contain settlement functions. How the design, technologies and spaces created or removed in settlements affect the functions and amenity of the settlement from the scale of personal shelter, to the home, and to urban business districts and precincts.
    • NETWORKS: Node-to-node systems and flows of resources, waste, data, people and information. How the design, technologies and flow of goods, waste, resources, data, people and information affect a settlement's functionality and amenity.
    • SYNTHESIS:  Combined, coherent design and knowledge.  Physical design and planning; Ekistic theory expressed through evolving models and principles. How systems of systems may differ from small and remote to large and urban-dense settlements.

 

This journal invites and accepts four types of submissions, all double-blind and internationally peer-reviewed for their type:

  1. Scholarly articles/reviews (full papers, double-blind review): typically, with title, authors, institutional affiliations, abstract, keywords, body text (4500-7000 words), and APA 7th References at the end of the article. The Editor assigns papers to their best-fit classifications in the Ekistics grid index. Body text typically includes:
  • an introduction to a problem or topic outlining the need for or goals of the research
  • the key prior papers in Ekistics archives and other sources that best relate to the topic,
  • the methodological or conceptual framework and methods used
  • a summary of key results or findings
  • a critical concluding discussion
  1. Viewpoint articles: typically proposed by an academic or professional with considerable experience, with title, author, institutional affiliation, body text (1500-3000 words), and APA 7th References at the end of the article. They may focus on a timely issue that aligns with the journal's areas of interest.
  2. Scholarly essays/extended abstracts (double-blind review): typically, with title, authors, institutional affiliations, keywords, body text (1000-2500 words), and APA 7th References at the end of the article. These shorter submissions are well placed for academics and practitioners seeking to share a critical reflection of an issue, or for first- time students seeking to publish an academic submission (often co-authored with a mentor/supervisor). They may focus on a think piece style of critique, or a project in process, or a topic of interest for a geo-location or generic issue. Short Essays/Extended-Abstracts may be tested in Ekistics before a full paper version is submitted elsewhere.
  3. Practitioner, industry or citizen think-piece (short article only, peer review): typically, with title, authors, regional/organisational affiliations, keywords, body text (500- 1000 words). A Citizen Think-piece may be up to 3000 words. Where appropriate, APA 7th References at the end of the article may be included. These shorter submissions are well placed for practitioners, industry or citizens to raise provocative ideas to which we invite the research community to respond in subsequent issues.
  4. We welcome book reviews. Submissions are copy-edited, normally 1200-1500 words, designed to share with the readership community interesting or provocative volumes, monographs, or edited books that may be of interest to scholars, practitioners and students of human settlements, Habitat III New Urban Agenda, and the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations.